Skip to main content

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Research Studies

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder. The most common symptoms of IBS are abdominal pain or discomfort, often reported as cramping, along with diarrhea, constipation, or both. IBS is diagnosed when a person has abdominal pain or discomfort at least three times per month for the last three months without other disease or injury that could explain the pain. The pain or discomfort of IBS may occur with a change in stool frequency or consistency or may be relieved by a bowel movement. IBS is often classified into four subtypes based on a person’s usual stool consistency: 1) IBS with constipation (IBS-C), 2) IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D), 3) Mixed IBS (IBS-M), and 4) Unsubtyped IBS (IBS-U).

Investigators

4864-James-Stevenson, Toyia

Toyia N. James-Stevenson, MD, MBA

Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine

Read Bio

5447-Montero, Anne Mary

Anne Mary K. Montero, PhD, MS

Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine

Read Bio

4791-Shin, Andrea

Andrea Shin, MD

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Read Bio

Open Research Studies for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Association Between Lactase Deficiency, Symptoms of Lactose Intolerance and Small Intestinal Microbiome in Adults

Enrolling: Yes

Principle Investigator: Andrea Shin, MD

Primary Outcomes Measured:Lactase activity (µmol/min/g) will be assessed from small bowel biopsy specimens.

Secondary Outcomes Measured: 

  1. Symptom severity will be assessed using the lactose assessment tool
  2. The small intestinal microbiome will be assessed by 16S allele PCR sequencing and Shotgun Metagenomic Sequencing
  3. Maldigestion status will be assessed by hydrogen breath test
  4. The fecal microbiome will be assessed by 16S allele PCR sequencing and Shotgun Metagenomic Sequencing

Interested in this study? Please contact the coordinator below:
Alka Kadariya
akadariy@iu.edu
(317) 278-9296

View the study on clinicaltrials.gov

Efficacy of Psychological Therapies in Patients with Functional Bowel Disorders with History of Early Adverse Life Events or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Enrolling: Yes

Principle Investigator: Andrea Shin, MD

Primary Outcomes Measured:

  1. Early adverse life events
  2. Prevalence of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  3. Change in weekly number of complete spontaneous bowel movements
  4. Change in abdominal pain

 

Secondary Outcomes Measured:

  1. Presence of IBS or functional constipation
  2. Existence and severity of psychological comorbidities
  3. Health-related quality of life
  4. Constipation-related symptoms
  5. Constipation-related quality of life

Interested in this study? Please contact the coordinator below:
Alka Kadariya
akadariy@iu.edu
(317) 278-9296

View the study on clinicaltrials.gov

Fecal Bile Acids, Fecal Short Chain Fatty Acids and the Intestinal Microbiota in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Control Volunteers: Diet Challenge

Enrolling: Yes

Principle Investigator: Andrea Shin, MD

Duration: 6 days, 3 visits

Primary Outcomes Measured:

  1. Total fecal bile acids
  2. Total fecal short chain fatty acids
  3. Individual fecal short chain fatty acids
  4. Fecal microbial population
  5. Fecal inulin

Secondary Outcomes Measured:

  1. Percent primary fecal bile acids
  2. Stool characteristics

Interested in this study? Please contact the coordinator below:
Alka Kadariya

akadariy@iu.edu

(317) 278-9296

View the study on clinicaltrials.gov

Fecal Metabolome and the Intestinal Microbiota in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Enrolling: Yes
Principle Investigator: Andrea Shin, MD
Primary Outcomes Measured:

  1. Total and individual fecal bile acid excretion
  2. Total fecal excretion of short chain fatty acids
  3. Fecal microbial population and community from stool

Secondary Outcomes Measured:

  1. Fecal excretion of individual short chain fatty acids
  2. Stool characteristics

Interested in this study? Please contact the coordinator below:
Alka Kadariya

akadariy@iu.edu

(317) 278-9296

View the study on clinicaltrials.gov