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Rotations and Training

A 12-month long program, the Psychology Internship at Indiana University School of Medicine begins on the first working day of July and continues through the last working day of the following June. The training year is structured into two, 6-month core rotations (two-and-a-half days per week), which are determined by track.

Clinical Experience

To ensure breadth of training, interns are expected to complete at least one core or elective rotation in a traditional psychology clinic setting as well as one core or elective in a behavioral medicine setting. Psychology interns are also required to complete at least one core or elective rotation with an adult population and at least one core or elective rotation with a child-adolescent population. Interns must also complete two days of elective rotations per week during each of the six month rotations. Specific elective rotations are selected via post-match discussion between each intern and the training director based on the intern’s interests and training goals.

Didactics

In addition to the core rotations and elective rotations, interns attend a series of weekly didactics presented on a wide variety of topics. These didactics take place on Fridays (1-4 pm). Interns also attend Director’s Conference weekly on Fridays (12-12:45 pm), just prior to didactics. This is an opportunity for interns to have regularly scheduled time with the director of training and/or the assistant directors of training.

Interns also attend the Psychiatry Department Grand Rounds on Fridays (11 am–12 pm), September through May). Interns must attend at least 75 percent of the Grand Rounds, or they are asked to make up missing sessions by viewing recorded sessions.

Interns have the opportunity to schedule Quarterly Educational Seminars (QES) and are encouraged to develop full-day workshops, which need to include at least 6 hours of educational activity in areas of interest specific to the intern class. The interns, coordinated by the chief intern, can select a topic from a list of available programs or create their own seminar. These seminars are to be conducted four times a year, once per quarter on preset days. One QES is done in the memory of Robert Ten Eyck, who supervised Psychology interns for many years. Funds are available for food and other seminar activities.

Core Rotations

Rotation schedules are established during the spring prior to the start of the internship taking into account each intern’s training goals. Incoming interns, program leaders and supervisors work collaboratively to determine the best combination of rotations for each intern. Psychology interns train at clinical facilities in Indianapolis, including the IU Neuroscience Center/Goodman Hall, Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health, the Pediatric Care Center (a Riley Hospital for Children/IU Health facility), IU Health University Hospital clinics, and IU Health North-Meridian Crossing.

The Adult Health Psychology interns will each complete two of the following four Core rotations. Specific Core rotations will be selected after the Match with intern preference taken into account. Each rotation can only accommodate one intern per rotation.


Adult Heart/Lung Transplant and Adult Sleep Rotation

 Supervisor: Yelena Chernyak, PhD, HSPP

The goal of this core rotation is for interns to have a breadth of experience in providing health psychology services to adults in a variety of outpatient clinical treatment settings including cardiology and behavioral sleep medicine. The setting for this rotation is divided between the IU Health Adult Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic and Study Center at the IU Health Neuroscience Center and Methodist Hospital’s Acute Heart and Lung Care Clinic. Specialized services provided include assessment, consultation, individual and group psychotherapy primarily utilizing CBT/ACT and other empirically supported interventions to deliver behavioral medicine, psychosocial support, coping skills building, symptom management, and behavioral modification. Interns will have the opportunity to work with a medically diverse clinical population experiencing acute and chronic medical conditions, provide consultation services, and interact with a multi-disciplinary medical team, and attend clinical case rounds in hospital-based clinics.  All clinical settings have a teaching mission allowing interns to interact with residents and fellows from various departments. IUH is a tertiary care facility with nationally and internationally recognized programs in specialized medical care. Please note: the two-and-a-half days per week of this Core rotation must include a full day on Tuesdays (Adult Sleep Clinic) and a full day on a Monday or Thursday (Heart/Lung Clinic). 

Adult Pain Clinic Rotation

Supervisors: Danielle Henderson, PhD, HSPP, and Amanda Wakefield, PhD, HSPP

Interns will have the opportunity to gain a broad perspective on working with adult patients who have chronic pain. The intern will participate in group and individual therapy sessions within the interdisciplinary Pain Rehabilitation Program at IU Health, complete presurgical evaluations for pain interventions (e.g., spinal cord stimulators, intrathecal pain pumps), and participate in psychological evaluations through the Pain Navigation Service. Individual and group modalities will primarily utilize CBT and ACT along with other empirically supported treatments for chronic pain. Interns will have the opportunity to interact with providers from multiple specialty areas within pain management and shadowing opportunities with multiple pain specialties will be available based on intern preferences and provider availability. The two-and-a-half days per week of this Core rotation will include a full day on Mondays (pre-surgical evaluations), a full day on Tuesdays (Pain Rehabilitation), and a half-day on Friday mornings to complete any needed paperwork and/or readings.  


Adult Outpatient Rotation

Supervisors: Tori Powers, PhD, HSPP, and Kendra Hinton-Froese, PhD, HSPP

The intern will see approximately five patients per day on each of two days per week in clinic with an additional half day on Friday mornings for paperwork. Interns will provide evidence-based psychotherapy (this includes conducting a clinical interview and diagnostic assessment) that has been individualized to each patient’s needs. Interns will gain experience incorporating social factors (e.g., racism, sexism, loss of status, violence, disability, socioeconomic status) into their diagnostic assessments and in determining appropriate treatment goals. Interns will have the opportunity to provide care for patients with a variety of presenting concerns, including, but not limited to ADHD; adjustment disorder; anxiety disorders, bipolar and related disorders; depressive disorders; obsessive-compulsive and related disorders; and trauma-and stressor-related disorders. Interns will gain experience with a variety of modalities such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral therapy, and Dialectical Behavior Therapy skills, based on the patients’ needs. A significant portion of the patients have a trauma history, and as such interns may gain experience with trauma-informed care and trauma-focused treatments such as Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure. Many of the patients also present with medical comorbidities, and interns may have the opportunity to treat patients with post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). For the PICS patients there may be opportunities to participate in multidisciplinary team meetings to coordinate patient care and a monthly support group.

 

Adult Solid Organ Transplant (Inpatient and Outpatient)

Supervisors: Rachel Holmes, PhD, HSPP, and Anahli Patel, PsyD, HSPP 

Interns will have the opportunity to conduct diagnostic assessments, pre-transplant evaluations, post-transplant intervention, and provide consultation to different specialty medical teams in both an outpatient and inpatient hospital setting. There are also opportunities to participate in the transplant support groups and weekly transplant meetings for the liver, pancreas, kidney, and multi-visceral teams. The patient population is organ transplant candidates, recipients, and donors. Experience on this rotation will be partially determined by the intern’s learning objectives and prior training experience. 

Supervisors: Noha Minshawi-Patterson, PhD

The Autism Spectrum and Developmental Disorders Clinic is a comprehensive, hospital-based and university-affiliated treatment center engaging in clinical care, research, education and outreach activities in the state of Indiana. We are actively serving over 800 individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and other neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDD) of all abilities and developmental levels. The Autism Spectrum and Developmental Disorders Clinic and our corresponding internship program is unique in that we provide both diagnostic evaluations and treatment services. Interns receive extensive training and supervision in both the assessment of ASD and other NDDs, as well behavioral interventions grounded in Applied Behavior Analysis and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. 

Who We Serve: The Autism Spectrum and Developmental Disorders Clinic serves individuals from birth through early adulthood. Our primary referral concerns are: language delay, aggression, tantrums, self-injury, social skill deficits, oppositional behavior, anxiety, depression, and adaptive skills deficits (i.e., toileting). Our patients often have complicated presentations that include genetic syndromes (e.g., Fragile X, Down’s Syndrome, Angelman’s Syndrome) and medical complications (e.g., feeding disorders, childhood cancer, seizure disorders, mitochondrial disorders). 
Services We Provide: The Autism Spectrum and Developmental Disorders Clinic provides families with comprehensive evaluations and ongoing clinical care for interfering behavior problems and skill deficits. We receive referrals from across the state and surrounding states for our complex diagnostic decision making and behavioral and medical treatment expertise. Services we provide include:
Diagnostic Assessments – determine appropriate diagnoses and assess for ASD. Evaluation includes a semi-structured caregiver interview and child observation. Feedback, diagnosis and treatment recommendations are provided and family is connected to local supports and resources.

Comprehensive Evaluation – when additional information is needed, formal testing completed to assess ASD, ID, and other diagnoses. Includes ADOS, behavior rating scales, cognitive assessments, and assessment of adaptive skills.

ABA-Based Parent Management Training – address behavior problems and skill deficits through Applied Behavior Analysis-based parent training. This include antecedent interventions (e.g., visual supports, schedule changes), function-based consequences (e.g., planned ignoring, differential attention, positive reinforcement) and teaching replacement skills (e.g., functional communication, coping skills).
Individual Cognitive Behavioral Therapy – address co-morbid diagnoses (e.g., anxiety, depression) in higher functioning individuals with ASD. Basic CBT is modified to meet the individual’s needs, drawing from a number of interventions such as Facing our Fears and ZONES of Regulation.
Medication Management – psychiatrists and psychiatry residents manage behavior problems through psychotropic medications.
Intern Responsibilities: Interns receive intensive training in both assessment and treatment of ASD and NDDs. Including:
Intern Time Breakdown:
 Two-and-a-half-days per week for 12-months in the CSATC, two days per week in elective rotations, and a half day per week in didactics
Average of two diagnostic assessments and one comprehensive assessment per week
Average of five therapy patient slots per week (average caseload of 12-15 therapy patients at a time)
Behavioral Treatment Services:
Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) focused interventions, including RUBI Parent Training protocol
Lead individual parent training
Conduct individual therapy using modified Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques
Treatment planning focused on antecedent, behavior, and consequence
Assessment Services:
Conduct diagnostic interviews and observations
Consider differential diagnoses (e.g., ADHD, disruptive behaviors, Intellectual Disability)
Complete comprehensive evaluations when appropriate (e.g., IQ testing, adaptive skills, structured interviews)
Additional Intern Opportunities: In addition to the above experiences, the intern in the Autism Track will also receive Crisis Prevention Intervention Training, ADOS-2 training through an ADOS-2 Clinical Workshop, exposure to the ADOS-2 administrations and scoring, and the opportunity to do case presentations. There is also opportunities for Interns to advance their scholarly development within the Autism Track through optional work on case studies, chart reviews, journal reviews, book chapter and manuscript preparation, as well as poster presentations at regional and national conferences. The CSATC also provides a one-year Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Autism. This fellowship program includes extensive standardized testing experience with ADOS-2 clinical reliability, behavioral interventions and parent training, contact hours and supervision necessary for licensure, and the opportunity to supervise practicum students and interns.

Supervisors: Amy Williams, PhD, HSPP, ABPPMichele Tsa-Owens, PhD, HSPP,  Mary Milder, PhD, HSPP, and Katherine Schwartzkopf, PsyD, HSPP

The Riley Pediatric Consultation and Liaison service offers inpatient mental health services hospital-wide. Consultation requests are received from various services including Hospitalist, Gastroenterology, Neurology, Hematology/Oncology, Rehabilitation, Pulmonology, Surgery, Developmental Pediatrics, Critical Care, Endocrinology, and Adolescent Medicine. Psychology interns will be involved in consultation requests involving diagnostic assessment, somatoform disorders, coping with chronic illness, safety evaluations related to suicidality/self-harm, pain management, adherence difficulties, behavioral interventions, feeding issues, and pre- and post-transplant evaluations. Interns will carry an average of two to four cases per day, including new initial assessments and follow-up therapeutic interventions. The CL team is a multidisciplinary team which includes psychologists, psychiatrists, and licensed clinical social workers. In addition, the intern will have the opportunity to work with psychiatry and triple board residents and medical students. Opportunities for supervision of medical students may be available.

Supervisors: Bill Kronenberger, PhD, HSPP, Ann Lagges, PhD, HSPP, ABPPGabriela Rodriguez, PhD, HSPPMelissa Hord, PhD, HSPP, and Allison Meyer, PhD, HSPP

The Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic offers outpatient mental health services to families with children and adolescents under the age of 19. Families present to the clinic with a wide range of psychiatric and co-morbid medical conditions and often with complex social situations. The child outpatient rotation is divided among a number of the clinics that exist under the larger umbrella of this general clinic. Interns on this rotation will participate in a combination of the following tailored to meet their training goals: the pediatric testing clinic (full day on Thursdays), TAC (Tics, Anxiety and Compulsions) Clinic (full day Mondays, Tuesdays or Wednesdays), and the Child and Adolescent ADHD/Disruptive Behavior Disorders Clinic (full day Wednesdays)

In all components of this rotation, the intern may have the opportunity to supervise a practicum student.

The pediatric testing clinic provides interns with experience providing intensive, full-day assessments to children and adolescents with complex issues involving cognitive abilities (approximately 90% of cases) and at times, issues involving personality/symptom assessment (approximately 10 percent of cases). The intern may be responsible for some test administration, but will most commonly provide supervised supervision to one or more practicum students administering tests, and will also engage in behavior observation and test interpretation. 

In the Tics, Anxiety and Compulsions (TAC) clinic, interns will gain experience working with children, adolescents and their families presenting with primary diagnoses of OCD, Tourette’s Disorder and other tic disorders, as well as other anxiety disorders including selective mutism. Treatment will include Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) for OCD and Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tourette’s (CBIT) as well as other evidence-based interventions as appropriate.  The clinic is multidisciplinary in nature which allows patients to receive therapy and medication management services at the same visit.  On Mondays, the team, including a psychologist, psychiatrist, psychiatric residents, psychology interns and psychology practicum students will meet prior to the afternoon clinic to discuss patients and engage in didactic activities.  

The Child and Adolescent ADHD/Disruptive Behavior Disorders Clinic is a full day per week and occurs on Wednesdays. Interns will primarily gain experience in providing therapy, specifically evidence-based treatment of ADHD and disruptive behavior disorders. Patients present with primary diagnoses including ADHD and/or ODD as well as comorbid diagnoses including depressive disorders and anxiety disorders. Patient ages typically range from 4 – 16 years. Treatment approach is most often behavioral parent training to manage disruptive behaviors and cognitive-behavioral therapy to manage comorbid disorders, typically using the Modular Approach to Therapy for Children (MATCH-ADTC) manual. Given the presenting problems of many of our patients, collaboration with schools and primary care providers is common. 

Training Supervisors: Liz Begyn, PhD, HSPP, ABPP-CN, Jana Chan, PhD, HSSP, and Kathleen Kingery, PhD, HSPP
Other agency/institution supervisor:  Brenna McDonald, PsyD, HSPP, ABPP-CN

The pediatric neuropsychology track intern completes two core rotations in pediatric neuropsychology, designed to provide advanced training in neuropsychological assessment of children and adolescents with major medical conditions and associated cognitive sequelae. The goal of this track is to prepare interns for future board certification in clinical neuropsychology, as well as for leadership in the field, and this is accomplished through diverse clinical activities and didactics. The primary clinical activity is outpatient neuropsychological assessment, and the intern also observes inpatient consultation on the rehabilitation unit and consultation in multidisciplinary medical clinics. The intern on this track will spend 50 percent of their overall training time in clinical neuropsychology, consistent with the Taxonomy for Education and Training in Clinical Neuropsychology.

Outpatient neuropsychological assessment takes place in the outpatient pediatric neuropsychology clinic, which serves patients ages four years through college age with major medical conditions (most commonly brain tumor, leukemia, epilepsy, concussion, traumatic brain injury, and genetic syndromes). Evaluations are conducted in one day, including interview, testing and feedback, to best serve our patients and families, who come from across the state for care. Interns participate in all aspects of the evaluation, with a developmental approach of increasing contribution throughout training. In addition to outpatient service, the intern also collaborates with the pediatric neuropsychology fellow on the inpatient rehabilitation unit, joins pediatric epilepsy surgery conference, and attends neuro-oncology multidisciplinary clinic and radiology conference (tumor board). There may be opportunities to participate in other multidisciplinary clinics as well. Neuropsychology-specific didactics include the pediatric neuropsychology seminar, pediatric neuropsychology case conference, and cultural competence seminar. Interns also have the opportunity to observe a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) evaluation, to further enhance exposure to the specialty of pre-surgical epilepsy evaluation. In addition to experience with a wide range of medical conditions, the intern will gain emerging specialization with specific medical populations, including neuro-oncology, epilepsy (with emphasis on pre-surgical), and TBI, through focused didactics, multi-disciplinary experiences, and clinical activities. The core rotation is complemented by the elective rotation with multidisciplinary experiences in RASopathy and TBI. 
 
Our clinical neuropsychology program is home to a vibrant learning community, which also includes pediatric and adult neuropsychology fellows and externs from local doctoral clinical neuropsychology programs. The majority of this rotation takes place at the IU Health Neuroscience Center/Goodman Hall, with additional opportunities at Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health.

Supervisors: Elaine Gilbert, PsyD, HSPP, Stephanie Hullmann, PhD, HSPP, Scott Wagoner, PhD, HSPP, and Amy Williams, PhD, HSPP, ABPP

Interns on this rotation will participate in a combination of the following tailored to meet their training goals: The Pain Center Specialty Clinic, Pediatric Psycho-oncology and The Pediatric GI Clinic. Please see the elective rotation descriptions for each of these clinics for more details.  

Elective Rotations

Supervisors: Lindsay Flegge, PhD, HSPP and Amanda Wakefield, PsyD, HSPP

Interns will gain pain psychology experience working and consulting on a multidisciplinary team in a specialty clinic performing individual and group therapy. Interns will experience interventions as part of IU Health’s pain rehabilitation program and as part of standalone pain psychology treatment. Interns will also learn how to conduct intake assessments and intervention planning for patients with chronic pain and other health concerns, including clinical interview and administrating self-report objective questionnaires. Interns will become proficient in using CBT interventions; additional opportunities may include exposure to specialty Empowered ReliefTM and biofeedback interventions for adults with chronic pain. Interns will develop skills in performing both in-personal and virtual interventions. 

Supervisor: Yelena Chernyak, PhD, HSPP

This rotation is one full day per week on Mondays, Wednesdays or Thursdays and can accommodate up to two interns per rotation. Interns will have the opportunity to conduct diagnostic assessments, pre-transplant evaluations, post-transplant intervention, and provide consultation to different specialty medical teams in both an outpatient and inpatient hospital setting. There are also opportunities to participate in the transplant support groups and weekly transplant meetings for the liver, pancreas, kidney, and multi-visceral teams. The patient population is organ transplant candidates, recipients, and donors. Experience on this rotation will be partially determined by the intern’s learning objectives and prior training experience. 

Supervisor: Tori Powers, PhD, HSPP and Kendra Hinton-Froese, PhD, HSPP

This rotation is available for up to two interns per rotation on Wednesdays with Dr. Hinton-Froese and two interns per rotation on Thursdays with Dr. Powers. Interns will provide evidence-based psychotherapy (this includes conducting a clinical interview and diagnostic assessment) that has been individualized to each patient’s needs. Interns will gain experience incorporating social factors (e.g., racism, sexism, loss of status, violence, disability, socioeconomic status) into their diagnostic assessments and in determining appropriate treatment goals. Interns will have the opportunity to provide care for patients with a variety of presenting concerns, including, but not limited to ADHD; adjustment disorder; anxiety disorders, bipolar and related disorders; depressive disorders; obsessive-compulsive and related disorders; and trauma-and stressor-related disorders. Many patients’ presentations are complex. Interns will gain experience with a variety of modalities such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral therapy, and Dialectical Behavior Therapy skills, based on the patients’ needs. A significant portion of the patients have a trauma history, and as such interns may gain experience with trauma-informed care and trauma-focused treatments such as Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure. Many of the patients also present with medical comorbidities, and interns may have the opportunity to treat patients with post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). For the PICS patients there may be opportunities to participate in multidisciplinary team meetings to coordinate patient care and a monthly support group.

Supervisor: Gabriela Rodríguez, PhD, HSPP

Please note: This rotation is an option as part of the Child/Pediatric Track Child Outpatient Core Rotation, and is part of Core Rotation B for the Child/Autism Track Internship.

The Child and Adolescent ADHD/Disruptive Behavior Disorders Clinic is a full day per week, occurs on Wednesdays and can accommodate up to two interns total (core plus elective) per rotation. Interns will primarily gain experience in providing therapy, specifically evidence-based treatment of ADHD and disruptive behavior disorders. Patients present with primary diagnoses including ADHD and/or ODD as well as comorbid diagnoses including depressive disorders and anxiety disorders. Patient ages typically range from 4 – 16 years. Treatment approach is most often behavioral parent training to manage disruptive behaviors and cognitive-behavioral therapy to manage comorbid disorders, typically using the Modular Approach to Therapy for Children (MATCH-ADTC) manual. Given the presenting problems of many of our patients, collaboration with schools and primary care providers is common. 

Supervisor: Kelly Donahue, PhD, HSPP

This rotation occurs on Wednesdays in the Pediatric Care Center and can accommodate one intern per rotation. The intern will participate in clinical care provided as part of the Riley Gender Health Program, conducted through the Department of Pediatrics in the Division of Adolescent Medicine. The adolescent medicine clinic is located in the Pediatric Care Center. Interns will receive supervision in the provision of gender-affirming care for transgender and gender-expansive adolescents and young adults. Primary focus is on conducting initial assessments for new patients, providing ongoing psychological support as patients explore their gender identity or pursue gender-affirming social or medical transition, and providing psychoeducation to families and addressing caregiver concerns or misperceptions about their child’s gender identity and associated goals. 

Supervisor: Ann Lagges, PhD, HSPP, ABPPMelissa Hord, PhD, HSPP, and Allison Meyer PHD, HSPP

Please note: This rotation is an option as part of the Child/Pediatric Track Child Outpatient Core Rotation, and is part of Core Rotation A for the Child/Autism Track Internship

This rotation is a full day per week and occurs on Mondays with Dr. Lagges or Dr. Meyer, Tuesdays with Dr. Hord and Wednesdays with Dr. Lagges. The rotation can accommodate up to four interns total (core plus elective) on Mondays, one on Tuesdays, and three on Wednesdays during each rotation. Interns will gain experience working with children, adolescents and their families presenting with primary diagnoses of OCD, Tourette’s Disorder and other tic disorders, as well as other anxiety disorders. Treatment will include ERP for OCD and Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tourette’s (CBIT) as well as other evidence-based interventions as appropriate. The clinic is multidisciplinary in nature which allows patients to receive therapy and medication management services at the same visit. The team, including a psychologist, psychiatrist, psychiatric residents, psychology interns and psychology practicum students will meet prior to the afternoon clinic on Mondays to discuss patients and engage in didactic activities with interns having the opportunity to present. Interns will most likely have the opportunity to assist in supervision of practicum students. 

Supervisor: Amanda Broderick, PhD, HSPP

This rotation occurs on Mondays and can accommodate one intern per rotation. In this rotation, interns will provide evidence-based treatments for youth (ages 5-17) who have experienced trauma and exhibit posttraumatic stress symptoms. Interns will develop skills in differential diagnosis, selection and administration of trauma and symptom assessments (e.g., CPSS-5), case conceptualization, providing treatment recommendations for complex cases, and delivery of evidence-based trauma treatments. Interns will be trained in Trauma Focused-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and will learn how to deliver treatments to a wide range of family configurations. There may be opportunities to learn additional modalities for cases in which TF-CBT is not indicated. Interns will also gain an understanding of the child welfare system within the state of Indiana. Interns will receive weekly individual supervision and may participate in supervised supervision of practicum students.

Supervisor: Melissa Hord, PhD, HSPP

This rotation is a full day per week and occurs on Wednesdays with Dr. Hord; the rotation can accommodate up to two interns total during each rotation. Patients typically consist of children ages 2-7 and their caregivers. PCIT is an evidence-based treatment for disruptive behavior disorders and ADHD. PCIT is conducted through "coaching" sessions in which caregivers and the child are observed from behind a one-way mirror. Caregivers are coached "in the moment" through a bug-in-the-ear device on developing skills to manage their child's behavior. Interns will learn the PCIT protocol and develop skills for coaching caregivers and coding both verbal and behavioral interactions that occur during sessions. Due to the length of internship rotations, interns will not have the opportunity to become certified in PCIT; however, interns will learn skills that are useful for all clinicians who work with children and how to apply those within the clinical setting. In addition, interns will gain experience with PCIT that will help them understand if certification is a step they wish to pursue as well as an understanding of the certification process and steps they can take to become certified.

Supervisor: Sarah Morsbach Honaker, PhD, HSPP, CBSM, and Maureen McQuillan, PhD, HSPP


The intern will participate in pediatric behavioral sleep medicine clinics conducted through the Section of Pulmonology, Allergy, and Sleep Medicine in the Department of Pediatrics. Under the supervision of a psychologist with board certification in behavioral sleep medicine and in collaboration with several sleep physicians, they will provide assessment and treatment services for youth ages 0-18 presenting with sleep problems. Initially, the intern will shadow the supervising psychologist and then gradually provide more services independently. The intern will also make follow-up phone calls to families to discuss treatment progress and engage in structured learning experiences (e.g., webinars, readings) to develop skills and knowledge in behavioral sleep.

During the second half of the rotation, the intern will take the lead conducting co-therapy with patients. Treatments are typically short-term (2-4 sessions), are highly focused and specific to sleep problems, and have a strong basis in cognitive-behavioral psychology. While the most frequent presenting complaint will be insomnia, treatment will also address problems such as nightmares, circadian rhythm disorders and hypersomnias. In addition to developing a strong foundation and understanding of normal sleep and behavioral sleep medicine treatments, the intern will gain familiarity with actigraphy as a clinical assessment tool, observe part of an overnight polysomnogram, shadow a sleep physician in clinic, and learn to screen for medical sleep disorders. The training experience further includes opportunities to work with infants and toddlers. This rotation is offered only on Wednesdays at IU Health North in Carmel. This is a full-day rotation. Previous experience in behavioral sleep medicine is desirable but not required. Intern hours accrued during this rotation can be applied towards certification in behavioral sleep medicine (DBSM certification offered by the Society for Behavioral Sleep Medicine).

Supervisors: Elaine Gilbert, PsyD, HSPP and Scott Wagoner, PhD, HSPP

This rotation is a half or full day per week and is available on variable days depending on interest and goals of the trainee. This clinical elective rotation is within the Riley Gastroenterology (GI) Division. Interns will learn research informed care for children and adolescents referred by their GI providers for a multitude of presenting issues including nonadherence, coping with chronic medical conditions, somatic and functional conditions, pain management, encopresis, as well as comorbid anxiety and mood issues. Beyond outpatient care this rotation has the potential to involve trainees in integrated clinics including the Healthy Weight Management Clinic and the Motility Clinic. Specialty skills that will be taught include brief assessment of patients with GI symptoms, cognitive behavioral therapy interventions for chronic medical conditions and pain management, as well as basic and advanced biofeedback skills.

Supervisor: Amy Williams, PhD, HSPP, ABPP

Please note: This rotation is an option as part of the Child/Pediatric Track Pediatric Outpatient Core Rotation

This rotation is a full day per week on Tuesdays or Thursdays, and can accommodate up to two interns per day per rotation total (core plus elective). Interns will gain experience in assessment and treatment of pediatric patients with chronic pain who present to the Riley Pain Center. Treatment involves CBT for chronic pain (and other evidence based interventions) and exposure to biofeedback (may be limited due to continued virtual care). The pain center is an interdisciplinary treatment team comprised of pediatric anesthesiologists, a physician assistant, pediatric psychologists, a pediatric psychology fellow, and physical therapists. Interns may have the opportunity to gain experience in supervision of practicum students. 

Supervisor: Stephanie Hullmann, PhD, HSPP

Please note: This rotation is an option as part of the Child/Pediatric Track Pediatric Outpatient Core Rotation

This rotation is one full day or two half days per week, is available on Monday or Tuesday and can accommodate up to two interns per rotation. Interns will have the opportunity to conduct intake assessments, psychotherapy, and consultations with children and adolescents with cancer and their families. Interns may see patients in the outpatient Pediatric Hematology/Oncology clinic, infusion center, and/or inpatient medical unit at Riley. Presenting problems include: adjustment disorder, anxiety, depression, behavior problems, nonadherence, symptoms management, and end-of-life issues. Treatment is primarily cognitive-behavioral. This rotation takes a developmental approach; initially, the intern will shadow the supervising psychologist and gradually gain more independence. There will also be opportunities to attend weekly interdisciplinary treatment team meetings in which the interns may collaborate with Pediatric Hematology/Oncology medical and psychosocial staff.  

Supervisor: Bill Kronenberger, PhD, HSPP

Please note: Please note, this rotation is an option as part of the Child/Pediatric Track Child Outpatient Core Rotation, and so if it is elected as part of that core rotation by the Child/Pediatric Track interns, it will not be available as an elective.  

This rotation is a full day per week and is only available on Thursdays; this rotation can accommodate one intern per rotation including Child-Pediatric Track interns who elect this as part of a core rotation and so may not be available as an elective to interns from other tracks. Psychological testing is conducted two or three days per month, with one patient per day. Contact hours average 6-8 hours per child. Approximately 90 percent of testing cases involve evaluation of cognitive abilities (intelligence, achievement, memory, executive functioning, etc.), and 10 percent of testing cases involve personality testing (projective and/or objective). The other one or two days per month are used for didactics, additional supervision, learning new tests, test interpretation, and review of results. The intern is responsible for some test administration but will primarily provide supervised supervision of a graduate student administering tests, behavior observation, and test interpretation; there is no report-writing. Supervision is provided by live observation of test administration, individual meetings focusing on test interpretation, and didactics covering major topics.