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Jenifer A. Akinduro, MD, MS, PGY2, was recently awarded a Panacea Financial Grant. The grant is awarded to 14 residents nationwide who demonstrate dedication to advancing healthcare and community well-being.

Akinduro Named a 2024 Panacea Financial Grant Winner

Jenifer Akinduro smiles for her headshot

62084-Akinduro, Jenifer

Jenifer A. Akinduro, MD, MS, PGY2, was recently awarded a Panacea Financial Grant. The grant is awarded to 14 residents nationwide who demonstrate dedication to advancing healthcare and community well-being. For Akinduro, whose parents immigrated from southwestern Nigeria in the 70s and 80s, that dedication transcends borders.  

“I have a very strong connection to my Nigerian culture. I travel back to Nigeria as often as I can, and I’m also part of the global health program here at IU,” Akinduro says. “I want to participate in a global health experience while I’m here at IU for residency, and I plan on doing that in January of 2025 during my third year of residency.”  

Akinduro is grateful for the $1,000 grant, which will help make her international practice possible. “There are financial opportunities and different things that the department, as well as the global health program, have for residents. But in order to defray some of the other costs, I decided, ‘Let me be proactive and apply for a grant like this.’” Fortunately, Akinduro’s dedication and proactiveness paid off. 

 

Changing Health Globally 

This grant provides Akinduro an opportunity to experience her parents’ home country differently. “As a Nigerian American, I get the opportunity to visit family and experience Nigerian society that way. But in terms of being in the clinical space in Nigeria, I've never had the opportunity to do that.” Now, she will get hands-on experience. “Every country that you go to, there's sort of a different method of how things work. I'm really, really excited to be able to work in obstetrics and gynecology and gynecologic surgery in Nigeria.” 

Akinduro is especially interested in exploring and addressing the disparities Nigeria women face. “We know that in populations of color, there are certain pathologies that may present differently,” Akinduro explains. “For example, we know that a lot of women of color, unfortunately, suffer from a more complex fibroid burden. We also know that Sub-Saharan African has some of the highest rates of cervical cancer just due to lower rates of cervical cancer screening. I'm hopeful to get to participate in different gynecologic surgeries in Nigeria to see how the pathology may present differently on the continent.” 

Another interesting difference she’s excited to experience first-hand is labor and delivery in Nigeria. “There’s a very high rate of twin birth in Nigeria. I would hope to be able to participate in that setting – and antepartum setting and high-risk OB setting.”  

Nicole P. Scott, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology and Residency Director, knows that Akinduro will do amazing work with this grant. “Dr. Akinduro is a bright young physician. She is passionate about tackling maternal mortality and addressing health inequities for minoritized populations. We are so lucky to have her at IU. I’m excited to see her advance research in maternal fetal medicine.”  

While the Panacea grant will make her travel possible, Akinduro’s medical and cultural knowledge and passion for maternal health will ensure her success in Nigeria.  
The views expressed in this content represent the perspective and opinions of the author and may or may not represent the position of Indiana University School of Medicine.
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Keeley Higley

Keeley Higley is the communications generalist for the Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Obstetrics and Gynecology.