Pediatrics

Ryan White Center for Infectious Disease and Global Health

The Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health at Indiana University School of Medicine is improving the health of children in Indiana and worldwide through the reduction and prevention of infection. With a research focus on malaria and HIV, infections that represent the leading causes of death and disability in children worldwide, faculty physicians at this center are recognized nationally for their work in global health.

Malaria Research

Malaria research at the Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health focuses on why children develop severe malaria and the neurodevelopment consequences of severe malaria. Investigators are exploring the risks of malaria in children with sickle cell disease and the effects of changing transmission on malaria immunity. Malaria researchers in this group include Andrea Conroy, PhD, Dibyadyuti Datta, PhD, Chandy John, MD, MS,  and Tuan Tran, MD, PhD.

HIV Research

HIV research at the Center focuses on adherence to HIV medications, stigma in HIV, disclosure of HIV status to children, evaluation and treatment of HIV in adolescents, and neurodevelopmental impairment in infants exposed to HIV. Researchers in this group focused on HIV are Leslie Enane, MD, Alka Khaitan, MD, and Megan McHenry, MD.
Chandy John, MD, Lab

Chandy John, MD, Lab

The John Lab focuses on malaria pathogenesis, immunology and epidemiology; the relationships between infection, nutrition and neurodevelopment; and infections in children with sickle cell anemia
Dibyadyuti (Dibya) Datta, MS, PhD

Dibyadyuti (Dibya) Datta, MS, PhD

The Datta Lab focuses on long-term sequelae in pediatric populations with severe malaria, investigating brain injury markers associated with neurodevelopmental impairments; and assessing health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after infection.
Tuan Tran, MD, PhD

Tuan Tran, MD, PhD

The Tran lab studies the human immune response to the Plasmodium infection as it relates to host tolerance and protection from the symptoms of malaria.