14781-Ingram, David
Faculty

David A. Ingram, MD

Executive Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs

Bio

Dr. Ingram received his Bachelor’s Degree in Religious Studies from Brown University, Master’s Degree of Theology/Ethics from Vanderbilt Divinity School, and M.D. Degree from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.  He completed a Pediatric residency at the University of California at San Francisco and a fellowship in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine.  Dr. Ingram was a fellow under the Pediatrics Scientist Development Program and is currently the Hugh McK Landon Professor of Pediatrics, and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, at Indiana University School of Medicine as well as Director of the Section of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at the James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children. Dr. Ingram is an Investigator in the Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research and a Consulting and Attending Physician at several local hospitals.  Dr. Ingram has published over 90 articles and book chapters.  He has served in a variety of roles for numerous scientific meetings and has participated in National Institutes of Health Study Section.  He is a current member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and served as the President of the Society for Pediatric Research from 2012-13.  Dr. Ingram’s research topics include Neurofibromatosis Type I, but most recently the discovery of the organization of the vascular endothelium into a hierarchy of endothelial stem and progenitor cells in collaboration with Dr. Mervin Yoder.

Titles & Appointments

  • Executive Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs
  • Hugh McK. Landon Professor of Pediatrics
  • Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
  • Education
    2002 FEL Indiana University School of Medicine
    1998 RES University of California at San Francisco
    1994 MD Vanderbilt University
    1992 MS Vanderbilt University
    1989 BA Brown University
  • Publications
    Neurofibromin is a novel regulator of Ras-induced reactive oxygen species production in mice and humans.
    Bessler WK; Hudson FZ; Zhang H; Harris V; Wang Y; Mund JA; Downing B; Ingram DA Jr; Case J; Fulton DJ; Stansfield BK; Free radical biology & medicine 2016 Jun 3
    Nf1+/- monocytes/macrophages induce neointima formation via CCR2 activation.
    Bessler WK; Kim G; Hudson FZ; Mund JA; Mali R; Menon K; Kapur R; Clapp DW; Ingram DA Jr; Stansfield BK; Human molecular genetics 2016 Jan 5
  • Professional Organizations
    American Academy of Pediatrics
    American Pediatric Society
    American Society for Clinical Investigation
    Midwest Society for Pediatric Research
    Perinatal Research Society
    Society for Pediatric Research
  • Board Certifications
    American Board of Pediatrics - Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
    American Board of Pediatrics - Pediatrics
  • Clinical Interests

    Utilizing genetically engineered mouse models to study childhood cancers and vascular malformations.  Characterizing the biology of endothelial progenitor cells and myeloid precursors in repairing damaged blood vessels and developed cell culture and FACS methods for their isolation for potential clinical utility. Clinical: Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health IU Health University Hospital Eskenazi Health

  • Awards
    Org: Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society
    Desc: Alpha Omega Alpha
    Scope: National
    Date: 2002-01-01

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