13602-Goebl, Mark
Faculty

Mark G. Goebl, PhD

Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Address
635 Barnhill Drive
Medical Science, Room MS4071A

Indianapolis, IN 46202

Bio

Dr. Goebl graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 1980 with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Microbiology.  In 1985, he received his Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology from The University of Chicago working with Dr. Thomas Petes on the issue of essential DNA in the simple eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, otherwise known as Baker’s or Brewer’s yeast.  From 1986 through 1988, he was a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Genetics at the University of Washington where he worked with Dr. Breck Byers.  While working with Dr. Byers, Dr. Goebl began his long-standing interest ubiquitin-dependent protein turnover as it relates to the control of cell division, again focusing on the yeast system.  Since 1988, Dr. Goebl has continued these studies while moving through the ranks from Assistant Professor to Full Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis.

Titles & Appointments

  • Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
  • Education
    1985 PhD University of Chicago
    1980 BS University of Notre Dame
  • Research

    This laboratory uses Baker's yeast to study the regulation of early cell cycle events required for the initiation of S phase and DNA replication. We have found that an enzyme responsible for attaching the highly conserved protein ubiquitin onto other protein substrates is necessary for the transition into S phase. Our immediate goals are to determine how this ubiquitin-conjugating activity is regulated as well as to identify its substrate proteins. A variety of molecular, genetic, and immunochemical approaches will be employed.

Research Labs

Faculty research at IU School of Medicine is transforming health. Details about the medical research being conducted in faculty labs throughout IU School of Medicine are available in the Research section of this site.

Faculty Labs