Department of Medicine

Nephrology

The Division of Nephrology and Hypertension is committed to the research, treatment and prevention of kidney diseases, including acute and chronic renal failure, complications of chronic dialysis treatment, hypertension, and kidney stones and cystic disease.

Led by Sharon Moe, MD, the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension is one of the largest such Divisions in the U.S. It holds a diverse group of 47 faculty, including clinicians, physician scientists, and PhD faculty. We provide clinical care at six major hospitals, see nearly 10,000 patients in clinics per year, and have over 600 dialysis patients at 17 different units, specializing in home therapies. Our kidney transplant program performs over 200 transplants per year, specializing in highly sensitized patients. The Division has more than $9 million in extramural research, with a diverse portfolio of NIH-funded laboratory and clinical research, Veterans Affairs funding, industry/foundation funded trials and investigator-initiated support. We have a strong fellowship program with five trainees per year, and support trainee research through NIH funded T32 grant. Faculty are active leaders in the American Society of Nephrology, National Kidney Foundation and Renal Physicians Association.

This video from WebsEdge/Health features Indiana University School of Medicine Division of Nephrology and Hypertension research activities.

33
nephrologists
8
PhD investigators
700
dialysis patients annually
Research

Research

Scientists and clinician-investigators in this division perform a broad range of research--from basic molecular and cellular biology to translational and clinical research.
Clinical Care

Clinical Care

Faculty physicians work as part of a multidisciplinary team to ensure each patient is provided with outstanding care and receive the therapy that is best suited to meet the individual’s needs and lifestyle.
Fellowship

Fellowship

The Nephrology team offers two fellowship programs: a categorical fellowship in nephrology and a Transplant Nephrology Fellowship.

Home to the Largest Transplant Program in Indiana

Indiana University School of Medicine is home to the largest transplant program in Indiana, with more than 200 kidneys transplanted each year. The Division of Nephrology survival rates for kidney transplants—and overall—exceed the national average, and ongoing laboratory investigations are exploring the mechanisms and treatments of acute kidney injury, polycystic kidney disease and diabetic nephropathy. This team of specialists are also investigating how tubular dysfunction leads to long-term fibrosis and kidney failure.