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About Dr. Charles H. Turner

Dr. Charles Turner (1961 – 2010) was an internationally recognized scientist and engineer who made significant contributions to the understanding of mechanical adaptation of bone, mechanotransduction, and the skeletal effects of genetic modification in animal models, making fundamental discoveries in each of these areas.

Born on Nov. 29, 1961, in Roswell, New Mexico, Dr. Turner earned a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Texas Tech University in 1983 and a PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Tulane University in 1987. After four years with the Osteoporosis Research Center at Creighton University, he joined the Purdue University faculty at IUPUI as a chancellor’s professor and the associate director of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. He also held a joint appointment within the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at IU School of Medicine where he served as the director of orthopaedic research.

Throughout his career, Dr. Turner authored more than 250 peer-reviewed manuscripts and gave more than 100 invited presentations across the world. He was the recipient of many awards, including the highly coveted Fuller Albright Award from the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research and the Outstanding Young Investigator Award from the Whitaker Foundation and the Health Future Foundation. Dr. Turner was elected a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers in 2002 and was awarded the Abraham M. Max Distinguished Professor Award in 2006 from the Purdue University School of Engineering and Technology.

The Charles H. Turner Young Investigator Bone Research Award was established in 2011 in honor of Dr. Turner. This travel award supports IU School of Medicine trainees at all levels to attend the Advances in Mineral Metabolism (AIMM) meeting each year, and the Sun Valley Meeting every two years.

Award Recipients

Trupti Trivedi received her PhD in 2014 from Concord Clinical School, University of Sydney, Australia. Her area of research involved the role of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human breast cancer and its growth in bone. To study bone metastases in detail, she came to IU School of Medicine to work under Theresa Guise, MD as a research scholar during her PhD studies. While working in Dr. Guise’s lab, Dr. Trivedi’s work has been focused on the role excess TGF-β1 mediated high bone turnover associated with skeletal muscle weakness in a mouse model of metabolic bone disease.

Title: Impact of high bone turnover on skeletal muscle weakness in mouse model of Camurati-Engelmann Disease

Authors: Trupti Trivedi, Jenna N. Regan, David L. Waning, Sutha John, Yun She, Sreemala Murthy, Khalid S. Mohammad and Theresa A. Guise

Kyung Shin Kang received his PhD in mechanical engineering from Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH, South Korea) in 2013. He joined the lab of Alexander Robilng, PhD within the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at IU School of Medicine  in order to develop his skills in mechanotransduction techniques. Dr. Kang’s long-term goal is to better understand anabolic effects of mechanical stimulation on bone remodeling. In addition, he is interested in utilizing 3D culture models to study bone cell metabolism.

Title: Osteoclast-selective expression of Lrp5-HBM-causing mutations alters bone metabolism

Authors: Kyung Shin Kang and Alexander G. Robling

Erica L. Clinkenbeard received a PhD degree from University of Kentucky, focusing on the porto-central gene regulation of hepatic alpha-fetoprotein by β-catenin as well as the role of hepatic zinc-finger homeobox 2 (Zhx2) in atherosclerosis incidence. Dr. Clinkenbeard joined the lab of Dr. Ken White at Indiana University School of Medicine as a postdoctoral research fellow in 2012 where she is studying the regulation of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) in common and rare disorders of metabolic bone disease.

Title: Anemia and FGF23: identification of a novel mediator of phosphate metabolism

Authors: Erica L. Clinkenbeard, Keith R. Stayrook, Colin Ip, Taryn A. Cass, Lelia J. Summers, Mircea Ivan, Ernestina Schipani, Thomas L. Clemens, Kenneth E. White

Perla C. Reyes Fernandez graduated from the Autonoma University of Queretaro (Mexico) in 2006 with a BSc degree in Nutrition Science. She entered the Interdepartmental Nutrition PhD Program at Purdue University in 2010 where she joined Dr. James Fleet’s laboratory. Her PhD program has a Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition emphasis. Her dissertation is focused on identifying natural genetic variants that modulate the response of bone strength and structure to dietary calcium restriction.

Title: Duodenal Ca Absorption Increases to Compensate for the Loss of Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) from the Large Intestine and Kidney of Mice

Authors: Perla C. Reyes-Fernandez and James C. Fleet

Pierre P. Eleniste received a PhD degree from Northern Illinois University with a research emphasis on the production of stereoselective antibodies and their application as “tailor-made” chiral selectors in affinity techniques. In 2009, he joined Dr. Angela Bruzzaniti’s laboratory in the Department of Oral Biology at the Indiana University School of Dentistry. He performs research in the area of bone biology by identifying and characterizing key intracellular signaling proteins that are critical for osteoclast, osteoblast and osteocyte activities.

Title: Novel Role for Dynamin Phosphorylation and GTPase Activity in Osteoblast Migration

Authors: Pierre P. Eleniste, Su Huang and Angela Bruzzaniti

Julia Humm graduated from Saint Mary’s College with a degree in Biology in 2007. She entered the Indiana University School of Medicine’s BioMedical Gateway PhD program in 2008 and joined Dr. Fredrick Pavalko’s laboratory in the Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology in the summer of 2009. The primary goal of her PhD research was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying intergrin-mediated signaling that mediate bone’s response to mechanical loading.

Title: Live Imaging of Src Activation in Osteocytes in Response to Mechanotransduction

Authors: Julia M. Hum, Suzanne R.L. Young, Richard N. Day, and Fredrick M. Pavalko

Julia Humm graduated from Saint Mary’s College with a degree in Biology in 2007. She entered the Indiana University School of Medicine’s BioMedical Gateway PhD program in 2008 and joined Dr. Fredrick Pavalko’s laboratory in the Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology in the summer of 2009. The primary goal of her PhD research was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying intergrin-mediated signaling that mediate bone’s response to mechanical loading.

Title: Live Imaging of Src Activation in Osteocytes in Response to Mechanotransduction

Authors: Julia M. Hum, Suzanne R.L. Young, Richard N. Day, and Fredrick M. Pavalko