Skip to main content

Human Subjects Research

The Departments of Anesthesia, Neurology and Psychiatry at Indiana University School of Medicine are leaders in preclinical and clinical research and discovery. Faculty and staff investigators conduct innovative research in a wide array of areas and are supported by federal grants from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and Aging; the National Science Foundation; and the Department of Defense.

Enroll in a study

Participants who drink alcohol and are between the ages of 21 and 45 are needed. Compensation for these studies range from $200 and $575. Interested participants can complete a submission form.

Sign Me Up

Kareken Lab

The lab of David Kareken, PhD, professor of neurology, involves neuroimaging of the human brain’s reward system (using positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging) and motivated behavior for natural rewards, like food, along with drugs of abuse. Lab work is targeted to understand the brain and genetic vulnerabilities that may predispose individuals to disorders such as alcoholism and obesity. Research is funded by the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

Lab Page

fMRI of Chemical Sense Stimulation in Substance Use Disorders

This study takes place over the course of two days. On the first day, participants, between the ages of 21 and 26, receive an MRI while tasting small amounts of sugar and water. On the second day, participants administer alcohol to themselves intravenously at a desired level that is most enjoyable for them. This study and prerequisite screening interview takes place at Goodman Hall and/or IU Health University Hospital in Indianapolis, and is conducted Monday through Friday. Participants of this study will receive up to $325 with additional opportunities for payment throughout the study visit.

Imaging of Alcohol and Reward Seeking Behavior

This overnight study involves participants, ages 21 to 30, receiving an fMRI scan and an infusion of alcohol. Participants administer alcohol to themselves intravenously at a desired level that is most enjoyable for them. The study takes place at Goodman Hall and IU Health University Hospital in Indianapolis, and is conducted primarily on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Participants of this study will receive up to $575 compensation for their time, with opportunities for additional payment throughout the study visit.

Oberlin Lab

The lab of Brandon Oberlin, PhD, assistant professor of psychiatry, focuses on unhealthy decision-making, behavioral traits linked to addiction/alcoholism disorders, and brain activation governing those behaviors. Dr. Oberlin’s lab utilizes neuroimaging (fMRI) to better understand brain systems underlying addiction, laboratory behavioral tasks to measure behavior, and digital visualization methods for relapse prevention.

Lab Page

Neural Bases of Alcohol-Related Decision-Making

This one-day study involves participants, ages 21 to 45, receiving a short alcohol infusion and completing tasks during an MRI scan. The study takes place at the Stark Neurosciences Research Institute (Goodman Hall) in Indianapolis. This study are conducted Monday through Friday during business hours. Participants of this study will receive $200 with the possibility of earning more throughout the visit.

White Lab

The lab of Fletcher White, PhD, professor of anesthesia, involves neuroimaging of the human brain’s modulation of chronic pain (using positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging), quantitative sensory testing of post traumatic headache. Lab work is targeted to understand the brain and genetic vulnerabilities that may predispose individuals to chronic pain. Research is funded by the Department of Defense.

Lab Page

Chronic Headache due to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Adults: Alterations of Brain Function, Central Sensitization, and Inflammatory Processes

This study is comparing measures of pain sensitivity to heat, cold and pressure stimuli, levels of inflammation in the blood and changes in brain structure and function via a brain imaging scan in mild TBI patients to health individuals who have not experienced a TBI. Volunteers, between the ages of 18-65, must have recently experienced a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and experienced one or more of the following after your head injury: confusion or disorientation, not remembering events that occurred after your head injury for less than 24 hours or loss of consciousness for under 30 minutes.  We will ask you to complete three sessions lasting two to four hours at Goodman Hall. These sessions will take place within one to two weeks, one month and six months after your head injury. Participants will get paid $100 on first visit without imaging; compensation for the second and third visit with imaging is $200 each visit.