MD Curriculum

Phase 3 (Year 4)

The third phase of training emphasizes professional development activities, individualized career exploration and advanced clinical learning to prepare for residency. In this phase, students engage in robust clinical experiences that feature progressive levels of direct responsibilities in patient care, and they return to basics to explore the importance of their foundational-science knowledge in clinical settings and their ongoing self-directed, lifelong learning process.

Phase three of the MD curriculum includes the Transitions III course (Preparation for Residency) as well as required clerkships, including one sub-internship, and electives (7), which must include at least one professional development selective or capstone, at least one advanced-science selective, and at least four clinical-practice electives, one of which provides and advanced clinical learning experience.

The new Phase 3 MD curriculum is in the process of being finalized; the information here applies specifically to the legacy curriculum for MS4 students, which is in effect for the classes of 2017, 2018, and 2019.

Electives

After students complete required third-year clerkships, they must complete at least seven electives. Students can complete up to three away electives within the required seven.

Explore Electives

Clerkships and Sub-Internship Objectives

Upon completion of the Emergency Medicine Clerkship, medical students are able to:

  • Perform and interpret a relevant, problem-focused history and physical examination from a patient presenting to the emergency department with an undifferentiated complaint. (PC1)
  • Formulate and justify a differential diagnosis for the patient’s chief concern, prioritizing the likelihood of the diagnosis and considering worst-case diagnoses. (PC2)
  • Formulate and justify a diagnostic and therapeutic plan, including testing, treatment and disposition, for patients with undifferentiated concerns, acute illnesses and specific disease processes. (PC3)
  • Recognize diseases, injuries and life-threatening conditions that present to the emergency department. (MK1)
  • Explain the etiology, progression and/or prognosis of diseases, injuries and life-threatening conditions that present to the emergency medicine department. (MK2)
  • Interpret clinical data and describe the underlying pathophysiology of common cardiovascular, respiratory, neurologic, traumatic and toxicologic emergencies. (MK3)
  • Provide justifications for interventions to diagnose, prevent, treat and manage a specific patient’s diseases, injuries and life-threatening conditions that present to the emergency department. (MK4)
  • Use principles of evidence-based medicine to evaluate the efficacy of diagnostic and therapeutic options. (MK5)
  • Respond to clinical questions by independently seeking, analyzing and synthesizing evidence-based answers to advance clinical decision-making. (PBLI1)
  • Seek and accept feedback from colleagues, faculty, supervisors, advisors and other health care professionals and incorporate this information into daily practice. (PBLI2)
  • Demonstrate effective team work through collaboration with diverse patients, their supporters, multi-disciplinary health care professionals and other staff in the delivery of respectful and patient-centered health care. (SBP1)
  • Identify a patient’s social context and analyze how it relates to their current state of health. (SBP2)
  • Demonstrate responsiveness to the whole patient by advocating for the patients’ and teams’ needs over their own and treating patients in a fair, unbiased, nonjudgmental manner. (same as common CLO) (P1)
  • Demonstrate responsibility for one’s own learning through daily preparation, full participation in learning activities, initiative in patient care, and timely completion of clerkship requirements.
  • Act in a professional manner by demonstrating compassion, respect, honesty, integrity and punctuality. (P2)
  • Adhere to ethical and legal principles governing medical practice, including maintaining patient confidentiality, gaining informed consent, the provision or withholding of care, identifying and managing conflicts of interest, identifying, analyzing and addressing unethical and unprofessional behaviors, and maintaining appropriate boundaries in relationships with patients. (P3)
  • Communicate effectively with the health care team during provider changes and transitions of care. (ISC1)
  • Communicate effectively with patients and their families. (ISC2)
  • Modify communication styles in accordance with the clinical context and purpose of the conversation, demonstrating sensitivity to differences, values, and needs of others, with attention to one’s personal communication style. (ISC3)
  • Share information accurately in academic and clinical settings both in oral presentations and written documentation including in the medical record. (ISC5)
  • Incorporate health promotion and patient education on the basis of the patient’s or population’s needs. (PC4)
  • Perform and document common clinical procedures using appropriate techniques within the limits of the level of training. (PC5)
  • Determine the appropriate care setting for management of patients with an acute medical condition and use effective strategies to ensure patient safety during transitions of care. (PC6)
  • Explain how behavioral, cultural, economic, educational, environmental, lifestyle and psychosocial factors impact and interact with health, disease, care-seeking, care compliance, barriers to care and attitudes toward care. (MK7)
  • Contribute to a culture of health care and patient safety through compliance with national and institutional guidelines and protocols in addition to reporting real and potential errors or threats and participating in quality improvement activities. (SBP4)
  • Recognizing the role of emergency medicine in providing access to all patients at all hours, identify health care challenges faced by underserved populations and deliver quality and equitable care to all patients presenting with an acute condition. (SBP5)
  • Incorporate elements of shared decision making into communication with patients to facilitate their active participation in their health care. (ISC4)

Upon completion of the Radiology Clerkship, medical students are able to:

  • Order the appropriate imaging study, discuss key findings, and interpret data needed for a differential diagnosis. (PC2)
  • Integrate imaging data into a plausible plan of care. (PC3)
  • Correctly identify key imaging anatomy, including normal anatomic landmarks, on common imaging studies. (MK1)
  • Explain the basic principles of radiobiology and radiation protection. (MK2)
  • Using appropriate search patterns, identify and interpret urgent findings on common imaging studies. (MK3)
  • Explain the physical principles underlying each of the imaging modalities. (MK4)
  • Analyze and evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic imaging options using principles of evidence-based medicine. (MK5)
  • Respond to clinical questions by independently seeking, analyzing and synthesizing evidence-based answers to advance clinical decision-making. (PBLI1)
  • Seek, accept and apply feedback to clinical practice. (PBLI2)
  • Establish respectful, effective relationships with faculty, residents and peers as part of interpretation sessions and presentations. (SBP1)
  • Demonstrate responsibility for one’s own learning through daily preparation, full participation in learning activities, and timely completion of clerkship requirements. (P2)
  • Act in a professional manner by demonstrating compassion, respect, honesty, integrity and punctuality. (P2)
  • Adhere to ethical and legal principles in all interactions. (P3)
  • Communicate effectively with members of the health care team by clearly presenting clinical questions and data from the patient encounter. (ISC1)
  • Modify communication style based upon the purpose of the conversation. (ISC3)
  • Construct oral presentations or written documents representing an organized, focused, account of a radiologic case encountered during their clinical rotation. (ISC5)
  • Analyze costs and benefits of common imaging modalities. (SBP5)

Upon completion of the Sub-Internship, medical students are able to:

  • Perform and interpret a relevant, problem-focused history and physical examination in a hospitalized patient. (PC1)
  • Formulate and justify a prioritized problem list and differential diagnosis in a hospitalized patient. (PC2)
  • Formulate and justify a reasonable plan of care for a hospitalized patient. (PC3)
  • Differentiate normal and abnormal structure, function, growth, and/or development in a hospitalized patient. (MK1)
  • Explain the etiology, progression and/or prognosis of diseases, injuries, and functional deficits commonly seen in hospitalized patients. (MK2)
  • Recognize clinical presentations and explain the underlying pathology and pathophysiology of diseases, injuries, and functional deficits commonly seen in hospitalized patients. (MK3)
  • Describe the diagnosis, prevention, treatment or management of common of diseases, injuries and functional deficits commonly seen in hospitalized patients. (MK4)
  • Analyze and evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic options using principles of evidence-based medicine. (MK5)
  • Respond to clinical questions by independently seeking, analyzing and synthesizing evidence-based answers to advance clinical decision-making. (PBLI1)
  • Seek, accept and apply feedback to clinical practice. (PBLI2)
  • Identify the role and contributions of and establish respectful, effective relationships with the various members of the multi-professional health care team. (SBP1)
  • Identify a patient’s social context and analyze how it relates to their current state of health. (SBP2)
  • Demonstrate responsiveness to the whole patient by advocating for the patients’ and teams’ needs over their own and treating patients in a fair, unbiased, nonjudgmental manner. (P1)
  • Act in a professional manner by demonstrating compassion, respect, honesty, integrity and punctuality. (P2)
  • Adhere to ethical and legal principles in all interactions. (P3)
  • Establish and maintain respectful relationships with members of the health care team (peers, faculty and inter-professional colleagues) to facilitate the provision of effective care to patients. (ISC1)
  • Communicate effectively with patients and their families by listening attentively, allowing opportunities for questions, and maintaining appropriate eye contact. (ISC2)
  • Modify communication style based upon patients’ reactions and ability to understand. (ISC3)
  • Construct oral presentations and written documents representing an accurate, organized and appropriately focused account of the student-patient interaction.  (ISC5)
  • Incorporate patient education on the basis of the patient’s needs. (PC4)
  • Perform an appropriate written and verbal transition of care between providers and settings that minimizes the risk to patient safety. (PC6)
  • Incorporate knowledge of behavioral, cultural, economic, educational, environmental, lifestyle and psychosocial factors to understand health, disease, care-seeking, care compliance, barriers to care and attitudes toward care, and apply these factors to daily patient care. (MK7)
  • Incorporate elements of shared decision making into communication with patients to facilitate their active participation in their health care. (ISC4)
Phase Three

June 2017 through May 2018 (Class of 2018)

4-Week Clerkships, Electives, and Sub-Internships

 

2-Week Electives

 

June 1 – June 28, 2017June 1 – June 14, 2017
June 15 – June 28, 2017
June 30 – July 28, 2017June 30 – July 14, 2017
July 15 – July 28, 2017
July 31 – August 27, 2017July 31 – August 13, 2017
August 14 – August 27, 2017
August 29 – September 25, 2017August 29 – September 11, 2017
September 12 – September 25, 2017
September 27 – October 24, 2017September 27 – October 10, 2017
October 11 – October 24, 2017
October 26 – November 22, 2017October 26 – November 8, 2017
November 9 – November 22, 2017
November 27 – December 23, 2017November 27 – December 9, 2017
December 10 – December 23, 2017
January 2 – January 29, 2018January 2 – January 15, 2018
January 16 – January 29, 2018
January 31 – February 27, 2018January 31 – February 13, 2018
February 14 – February 27, 2018
March 1 – March 29, 2018March 1 – March 14, 2018
March 15 – March 29, 2018
April 2 – April 29, 2018April 2 – April 15, 2018
April 16 – April 29, 2018
April 30 – May 27, 2018April 30 – May 13, 2018
May 14 – May 27, 2018

Vacation Days: July 4 (Independence Day), November 23 – 26 (Thanksgiving Break), December 24 –  January 1 (Winter Break), March 16  (Match Day), May 28 (Memorial Day)

Campus Connection Days: June 29, August 28, September 26, October 25, January 30, February 28, March 30