Psychiatry

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What is gender dysphoria?

Gender dysphoria is a marked incongruence between one’s experienced/expressed gender and assigned gender of at least six months in duration.

Gender Dysphoria in Children

Gender dysphoria in children is manifested by exhibiting at least six of the following and is often associated with clinically significant distress or impairment in social, school or other important areas of functioning:

  • A strong desire to be of the other gender or an insistence that one is the other gender (of some alternative gender different from one’s assigned gender)
  • In boys (assigned gender), a strong preference for cross-dressing or simulating female attire; or in girls (assigned gender), a strong preference for wearing only typically masculine clothing and a strong resistance to the wearing of typically feminine clothing
  • A strong preference for cross-gender roles in make-believe play
  • A strong preference for the toys, games or activities stereotypically used or engaged in by other gender
  • A strong preference of playmates of the other gender
  • In boys (assigned gender), a strong rejection of typically masculine toys, games and activities and a strong avoidance of rough and tumble play; or in girls (assigned gender), a strong rejection of typically feminine toys, games and activities
  • A strong dislike of one’s sexual anatomy
  • A strong desire for the primary and/or secondary sex characteristics that match one’s experienced gender

Gender Dysphoria in Adolescents and Adults

Gender dysphoria in adolescents and adults is manifested by exhibiting at least two of the following and is often associated with clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of functioning:

  • A marked incongruence between one’s experienced/expressed gender and primary and/or secondary sex characteristics (or in young adolescents, the anticipated secondary sex characteristics
  • A strong desire to be rid of one’s primary and/or secondary sex characteristics because of marked incongruence with one’s experienced/expressed gender (or in young adolescents, a desire to prevent the development of the anticipated secondary sex characteristics)
  • A strong desire for the primary and/or secondary sex characteristics of the other gender
  • A strong desire to be of the other gender (or some alternative gender different from one’s assigned gender)
  • A strong desire to be treated as the other gender (or some alternative gender different from one’s assigned gender)
  • A strong conviction that one has the typical feelings and reactions of the other gender (or some alternative gender different from one’s assigned gender)