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Adult Track

Residents on the adult track in the Clinical Neuropsychology Residency Residents see outpatients referred from clinical departments within IU Health and the community. Patient diagnoses can include Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, brain tumors, traumatic brain injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis and environmental exposures. Residents in the adult track also see medico-legal referred patients. Residents have roles in clinical interview, testing, report writing and feedback to patients, families and referral sources. There are also sub-rotations in geriatric psychiatry, deep brain stimulation and epilepsy clinics. Typical caseload is three to four consultations per week.

Schedule

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday
 

New Patient Consultation

 

Umbrella Supervision

 

Older Adult Clinic (Based on Rotation)

 

 

New Patient Consultation

 

 

 

New Patient Consultation

 

Umbrella Supervision

 

Grand Rounds

(5:00pm-6:30 pm)

 

 

Thursday Conference (9:30am-11:00am)

 

New Patient Consultation

 

 

Psychiatry Rounds

(11:00am-12:00pm)

Didactics

2:00pm-4:00 pm

*Schedule subject to change per clinic needs.

Adult Track Opportunities

Residents in this track have the opportunity to participate in the epilepsy case conference, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) case conference and the older adult mental health clinic didactic.

Training Faculty

Maurissa Abecassis, PhD

Maurissa Abecassis, PhD

Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology
Courtney B. Johnson, PhD

Courtney B. Johnson, PhD

Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology in Clinical Psychiatry
David A. Kareken, PhD

David A. Kareken, PhD

Professor of Neurology
Daniel F. Rexroth, PsyD

Daniel F. Rexroth, PsyD

Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology in Clinical Psychiatry
Gwen Sprehn, PhD

Gwen Sprehn, PhD

Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology
Christopher C. Stewart, PhD

Christopher C. Stewart, PhD

Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology
Frederick W. Unverzagt, PhD

Frederick W. Unverzagt, PhD

Professor of Clinical Psychology