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PhD Courses in Cellular and Integrative Physiology

Current physiology (PHSL) and graduate (GRAD) course listings for physiology students are described here.

This course provides credit hours for laboratory rotations and independent research effort. For rotations, students consult with program faculty and select up to three laboratories in which students rotate for a minimum of five weeks each to perform laboratory research.

P: Graduate-level Physiology e.g. F503. This course provides students and fellows with the opportunity to extend their knowledge of human physiology by investigating the mechanisms of human diseases and understanding how physiological systems interact in order to maintain homeostasis in health and disease. This course builds upon the physiological principles students learned in F503, Human Physiology. A combination of lectures and team based learning are integrated with discussion of articles from the primary literature to develop the students understanding of how diseases affect the integrated physiology of humans.

Discussions and literature research in advanced areas of physiology.

Physiology course for graduate students (M. and PhD) providing an opportunity to solve medical cases using simulated patient discussions and laboratory results. Students receive real-life patient dialogs and laboratory test results to interpret and develop potential diagnoses and treatments.

Graduate level course in human physiology designed for students with no prior exposure to the discipline. Emphasis on basic physiological mechanisms of control with regard to membrane, neural, endocrine, reproductive, muscle, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal, and multi-systems physiology.

Invited international, national and local speakers present recent studies. Interactive with question and answer period.

P: Graduate-level cell biology course. The course is an integrated approach to studying the structure and functional relationships in epithelial cells, the role of this subcellular organization in normal physiology, and the disturbances that underlie pathophysiology. The emphasis is on reading and discussion of original review articles and research papers, and demonstrations of techniques to study epithelial functions in cultured cells, tissues and model organisms such as the zebrafish.

P: Graduate-level physiology course. Advanced study of the physiology, pharmacology and pathophysiology of the coronary circulation using contemporary methods is emphasized. Concepts of hemodynamics, cardiac regulation, vasomotor control, pressure pulses, etc. are reinforced. In vivo studies using angiography, intravascular ultrasound, coronary flow velocity measures, coronary angioplasty, and echocardiography in large animal models are compared with in vitro methods. An overall goal is to provide a rational basis for functional genomics and modern therapy. Approach is the use of current textbooks, select reviews, original research papers, interactive discussion, and laboratory demonstrations and projects.

P: Graduate-level physiology and cell biology courses. Advanced study of the physiology of the smooth muscle tissues with focus on the normal physiology and pathophysiology of airway smooth muscle and the airways. Biochemical and physiologic mechanisms in the regulation of contraction, growth and phenotypic expression in smooth muscle tissues are explored. Focus is on contemporary molecular and cellular and whole animal approaches for the study of muscle physiology, including tissue transfection and the genetic modification of smooth muscle tissues, organ culture, and methods for the measurement of contractility and contractile protein activation in intact and permeabilized tissues including confocal imaging, and in vivo measurement of airway function.

Given the current epidemic and foreseeable continuing trend of obesity and diabetes in the United States, emphasis is placed on responses and adaptations of the heart and coronary circulation to exercise in the setting of obesity- and diabetes-induced coronary disease. Concepts of exercise stimulus, quantification of work, and in vivo responses and adaptations will be fundamental to studies of cellular and molecular mechanisms of myocardial and coronary artery responses and adaptations to exercise. The approach taken is the use of current textbooks, select reviews, original research papers, interactive discussion, and laboratory demonstrations and projects.

P: undergraduate cell biology and biochemistry. Introductory physiology course for graduate students covering fundamental concepts of cellular and integrative physiology of tissues and organ systems. Basic physiology of the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems are covered. At the end of the course, students should have a basic understanding of the physiologic functions of cells, tissues and organ systems and should understand modern approaches for the measurement and interpretation of physiologic functions. (Offered every spring as a modular course in the IBMG gateway program.)

P: undergraduate cell biology and biochemistry. Introductory physiology course for graduate students covering fundamental concepts of cellular and integrative physiology of tissues and organ systems. Basic physiology of the endocrine, and gastrointestinal systems are covered. At the end of the course, students should have a basic understanding of the physiologic functions of cells, tissues and organ systems and should understand modern approaches for the measurement and interpretation of physiologic functions. (Offered every spring as a modular course in the IBMG gateway program.)

Advanced ion transport topics are selected by students from current areas of research on ion channels, pumps, and exchangers. Specific topics include transporter biophysical characteristics, long-term regulation, effects on cell and organ function, electrophysiological and optical methods for study. Format: textbooks, reviews, original research papers, interactive discussion, computer simulations, and laboratory demonstrations and projects. P: graduate cellular physiology or consent of instructor.

P: Graduate-level physiology course. Students read and discuss several classical or outstanding research papers in renal physiology. Laboratory experiences include measurement of renal function using clearance methods and demonstrations of micropuncture and in vivo imaging techniques. The course is intended for graduate students who plan to teach or do research in physiology or related disciplines.

P: Graduate-level cell biology course. The course is targeted to pre-doctoral graduate students in the IU School of Medicine with interest in advanced study of lipid rafts, a class of membrane domains that compartmentalize signaling molecules and macromolecule complexes to specific cellular sites, and spatially organize signal transduction in cells. The course reinforces membrane architecture and explore the molecular basis of lipid raft function and dysfunction in disease. The topics to be discussed include: biophysics of lipid lateral organization, biogenesis and maintenance of lipid domains, signal transduction from lipid rafts, and role of lipid rafts in disease. The overall objective is to provide a deep understanding of lipid rafts in membrane organization and cellular function. The course is comprised of a mixture of didactic lecture, reading and presentation of original research and review articles, group discussion, and laboratory demonstrations.

Biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, genetics, immunology, and pathophysiology of diabetes and obesity. Topics include metabolic regulation, signal transduction, insulin resistance, insulin production, beta-cell function, animal models, complications, nutrition, prevention, and therapy.

P: Graduate-level physiology course. Advanced study of the physiology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system using contemporary methods. Concepts of cardiovascular structure, function, hemodynamics, excitation-contraction coupling, signal transduction, and electrophysiology are reinforced. Format: lectures and facilitated interactive student discussion.

P: Graduate-level physiology course. The focus of this course is topical areas of advanced cardiovascular research, emphasizing modern approaches to study cardiovascular function. Topics change each semester but may include regulation of vascular tone, cardiovascular development, control of cardiac function, myopathies, atherosclerosis, and blood pressure. Format: Journal Club/Seminar and facilitated interactive student discussion.

Electives

Physiology Elective courses (one credit each) are offered to all graduate students wishing to enhance knowledge of a specific area of physiology. The recommended pre-requisites for these elective courses are G717 (basic cell biology course) and G735 and/or G736 (graduate level physiology courses). Each course includes a weekly two- to three-hour discussion for four to five weeks. These sessions are informal discussions of review and original research papers covering new technology and progress in each focus area. Demonstration of new laboratory technology relevant to the focus area may also be an integral part of some focus courses. Students are expected to prepare for each discussion or demonstration session. These courses are offered each year. Times and dates for courses are announced each year prior to the fall semester registration.

Students have a variety of elective topics to choose from including G703 Physiology of the Coronary Circulation, G704 Physiological Proteomics, F721 Designer Mice – Transgenes and Knockout Animals, G707 Physiology of Smooth Muscle, G708 Cardiac and Coronary Physiology of Exercise, G714 Development of the Vascular System, G762 Renal Physiology, G761 Molecular and Cellular Physiology of Ion Channels, and G782 Physiology and Pathophysiology of Lipid Rafts.