Pediatrics

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Multidisciplinary LEND Training Participation

Curriculum requirements for trainees in the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (LEND) program are similar across disciplines but vary slightly depending on the type of trainee. The multidisciplinary nature of the program allows trainees to share their unique perspectives with the cohort. All long-term trainees commit a minimum of 300 hours over the course of the year, which typically works out to one full day per week. This time can be put in physically at the Riley Child Development Center, or trainees can work on their project from home and/or within the community.  All trainees receive a stipend to compensate them for time invested in this program. Stipends can be applied to an IU Bursar bill if desired.

Audiology

Audiology coordinator: Amanda Weinzerl, AuD, FAAA

Audiology trainees complete assignments and project work at the Riley Child Development Center as well as from home and in the community.

Education / Special Education

Education trainees can be graduate-level students in education or special education or current practitioners wishing to expand their skills around children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Often, there is overlap between their LEND project and research being conducted as part of their graduate studies. Education trainees do not regularly participate in the Riley Child Development Center clinics but are welcome to observe them at least once.

Examples of past education trainee projects: Discourse of Disability and the Introductory Special Education Curriculum, Video Self-Modeling in an Inclusion Classroom, and It Takes a Village to Educate and Care for a Preschool Child with Special Needs.

Family Leadership

Family trainees are family members of persons with disabilities; they are active participants in LEND didactic sessions and are able to share their unique perspectives with the related professionals in the cohort.

Persons considered eligible for the family trainee positions are parents, siblings, spouses and relatives of a person with a disability. Family trainees do not regularly participate in the Riley Child Development Center clinics but can observe them.

Family Leadership coordinator: Cristy James

Previous family trainee projects: Sharing your story for advocacy purposes, supporting individuals with developmental disabilities in low-income housing, creating a parent guide around protecting children with disabilities from sexual abuse, using social media to support families, and developing specific support groups.

Law and Ethics

Some law trainees earn graduate credit toward their degree program through participation in the LEND program. Law trainees do not regularly participate in the Riley Child Development Center clinics but are invited to observe them at least once.

Previous law trainee projects: Guardianship issues and supportive decision-making, connecting pediatric hospital families with protection and advocacy services, health care access for children of immigrant families, and legislation for distribution of free prenatal vitamins.

Nursing

Nursing trainees participate in LEND training in a variety of different ways, depending on their desired training outcomes. Graduate-level nursing students as well as currently practicing nurses have used their LEND experience to refine and expand their nursing skills in the developmental disabilities community.

Nursing trainees are active participants in monthly didactic sessions and have the option of rotating through the Riley Child Development Center interdisciplinary evaluation clinic.

Examples of previous nursing trainee projects: Family Journeys with Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Health care providers caring for patients with autism in the ER, and Autism Spectrum Disorders and Pain Assessment.

Nutrition

Nutrition coordinator: Abby Hall

Occupational Therapy

Graduate-level OT students, as well as currently-practicing occupational therapists, have used their LEND training to refine and expand their skills in the developmental disabilities community.  Occupational Therapy trainees may participate in the Riley Child Development Center clinics, as their training and supervision needs allow. Often there is overlap between their LEND project and research being conducted as part of their graduate studies.

Previous Occupational Therapy trainee projects: A survey of the use of Pediatric Assessments in OT, The Effects of Equine-assisted therapies on functional & participation outcomes in children with Autism, A survey of postpartum depression screening by Early Intervention therapists, and Mothers’ scaffolding styles when discussing ethical dilemmas with their children.

Pediatrics

Pediatrics trainees typically participate in LEND training during their pediatrics residency. Many pediatrics trainees are only involved with the LEND program through participation in the Riley Child Development Center evaluation clinic as part of a rotation or a more-involved elective in Developmental Pediatrics.

Trainees that participate in the three-year fellowship in Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics are involved in the clinic as well as active participants in monthly didactic sessions and project work. Often, overlap exists between their LEND project and research being conducted as part of their residency.

Pediatric Dentistry

Dental trainees typically participate in LEND training during their pediatric dental residency. Dental trainees are active participants in monthly didactic sessions as well rotating through the Riley Child Development Center interdisciplinary evaluation clinic. Dental trainees attend required monthly didactic sessions and spend time in the Riley Child Development Center clinic. Homework and project work are completed on their own time. Often, overlap exists between the LEND project and research being conducted as part of their dental residency.

Examples of previous dental trainee projects: Factors Related to Failed Pediatric Dental Appointments Under General Anesthesia, Presurgical Orthapedics for Patients with Unilateral Cleft Lip & Palate, Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Nicotine/Tobacco Exposure on Streptococcus mutans Biofilm and Effect of Polyphenols, Silver Diamine Fluoride & Potassium Iodide Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm, Effect of Commonly Prescribed Liquid Medications on Streptococcus mutans Biofilm.

Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy trainees often work on their project from home or within their school. Overlap usually exists between their LEND project and research being conducted as part of Physical Therapy training. Physical Therapy trainees do not regularly participate in the Riley Child Development Center clinics but can observe them at least once.

Physical Therapy coordinator: Peter Altenburger, PhD, PT

Previous Physical Therapy trainee projects: Robot-assisted gait training protocols and outcomes, The Effect of Ankle Foot Orthoses Footwear Combination on Children Diagnosed with a Neurological Condition, Analysis of pediatric PT evaluation and assessment tools used clinically across the nation, and The Use of Standard Pediatric Physical Therapy vs. Alternative Therapy Practices.

Psychology

Psychology trainees have multiple levels of participation in the LEND program. Some choose to participate in the LEND program as an additional training during graduate school. Others participate in LEND training and clinics to fulfill practicum requirements while gaining clinical and testing experience under the supervision of LEND faculty. Both of these options require the full commitment of at least 300 hours to the program over the course of the year.

The third long-term LEND training option is to participate as a post-doctoral fellow in psychology, participating in LEND training and clinics while putting in supervised hours and preparing to take a licensing exam. Fellows are full-time employees at the Riley Child Development Center LEND and receive a larger stipend; they are expected to put in a full year at the RCDC.

All long-term psychology trainees are required to spend one day a month in the Riley Child Development Center classroom on the Indianapolis campus, as well as complete a LEND project.

Examples of previous psychology projects include: A Survey of Infant Mental Health Services Available to Children & Families Working with the Indiana Department of Child Services, Practitioner Competence Evaluating Developmental Disabilities in Immigrant and Refugee Communities, Parents Experience of Receiving their Child’s Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis, A Comparison of Stigma Experienced in Families with Individuals Diagnosed with Autism or an Intellectual/Cognitive Disability, and Response to Intervention Practices in Elementary Schools.

Public Health

Public health trainees often work on their project from home or within the community, and overlap typically exists between their LEND project and research being conducted as part of their graduate studies. Public health trainees do not regularly participate in the Riley Child Development Center clinics, but they can observe clinics.

Public Health Program Coordinator: Beth DeHoff, MPH

Previous public health trainee projects: Addressing Infant Mortality in Indiana, and Social support via digital communication as an avenue to supporting and educating parents of young children with special health care needs.

Self-Advocacy (Persons with Developmental Disabilities)

Self-advocates are individuals with a neurodevelopmental disability, such as autism, ADHD,  intellectual disability, or genetic disorders, who are interested in participating in the LEND training program. Self-advocates are active participants in LEND classroom learning sessions and are able to share their unique perspectives with the related professionals in the cohort.  Self-advocate trainees spend their time at the Riley Child Development Center or work from home or in the community. Self-advocate trainees do not regularly participate in the Riley Child Development Center clinics, but they can observe them. The stipend for self-advocate trainees can be distributed in different ways to ensure the program does not affect eligibility for income-based services.

Self-advocates who wish to apply can complete the self-advocate application.

Self-advocacy coordinators: Betty Williams and Melody Cooper

Examples of previous self-advocates’ projects include: Telling your story as a means of advocacy; A history & impact of the Self-Advocates of Indiana organization; Music therapy and how it helps individuals with Williams Syndrome.

Social Work

Social Work trainees are active participants in monthly didactic sessions as well learning through supervised experiences in the Riley Child Development Center interdisciplinary evaluation clinic. These trainees can be graduate-level students in social work or current practitioners wishing to expand their skills around children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. The LEND training program often meets internship or practicum placement requirements for social work trainees.

Social Work coordinators: Stephan Viehweg, MSW and Margo Ramaker, LCSW

Examples of previous social work projects: Care Coordination for CSHCN: How care coordinators find & utilize community resources, The Importance of Maternal Mental Health in Pediatrics, The Importance of Interpreter Services in Healthcare, Needs of Families with Children that Depend on Mechanical Ventilation, Assessment of the Psychosocial Needs of Patients with Cleft and Craniofacial Anomalies.

Speech – Language Pathology

Speech-Language Pathology trainees have multiple levels of participation in the LEND program. Some spend their time only in the Riley Child Development Center evaluation clinic for a short practicum experience under the supervision of LEND faculty. Others choose a longer post-graduate fellowship, which combines more extensive hours and responsibilities in the clinic along with the LEND didactic and project-based learning. Fellows are full-time employees at the RCDC LEND, receive a larger stipend and are expected to put in a full year at the Riley Child Development Center.

Speech-Language Pathology coordinator: Sarah Muir, MS, CCC-SLP

Examples of previous speech trainee projects: Spanish-speaking Parents’ Perspectives on Autism Support Groups, A Preliminary Co-Treatment Program for Preschoolers with Social and Emotional Difficulties, Outcomes of a Social Story in the Medical Setting, and Barriers to treatment for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities.