Muncie

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MD Education

Students at IU School of Medicine’s Muncie campus enjoy the same high-caliber medical education that the school offers at all statewide campuses. The Muncie location has the added benefits of small class sizes, a high level of personal attention from faculty, early clinical exposure, local opportunities for diagnostic skills practice and summer research or clinical experience. With class attendance at nearly 100%, students participate in class and lectures and seize the opportunity to ask questions, engage in dialogue, form bonds with faculty and shape their medical education experience in a collaborative learning environment.

Students at this campus also benefit from the proximity to IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital, one of the top 100 regional hospitals in the nation, and other reputable clinical care facilities. The clinical education portion of the IU School of Medicine MD curriculum, including third- and fourth-year clerkships and electives in Muncie, are held at these patient care facilities.

MD Enrichment Programs in Muncie

For some medical students following the successful completion of their first year, summer externships are available through IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital. Summer externships allow IU School of Medicine students extraordinary access to medical training in a hospital setting.

During the summer between first and second year, medical students in Muncie can participate in the Hospital Medical Education (HME) Program at Ball Memorial Hospital. This program includes two-week rotations in cardiology, family medicine, neonatology and surgery, and other focus areas. Rotations can be scheduled beginning in the second week of May through the beginning of the fall semester of the academic year. Participants are paid a weekly stipend of between $250 and $350 and receive a meal allowance of approximating $15 a day. Application process information for the upcoming summer is shared each December.

Medical students in Muncie can participate locally in the Indiana AHEC Summer Observership Program between their first and second year. Students are assigned to observe physicians in different clinical settings. The program runs for four or eight weeks. A stipend of $1500 for the four week program and $3000 for the eight week program is provided.

Concentration Topic: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Lifestyle choices regarding physical activity, nutrition, stress management and social support are major factors contributing to health outcomes. Changes in these behaviors can lead to better health outcomes, reduce health care costs and improve community health. Through this Scholarly Concentration, students learn how to help patients implement evidence-based lifestyle choices with a team of exercise physiologists, nutritionists, mental/behavioral health counselors, social workers and other health professionals.